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Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

4 edition of British West Indies and the sugar industry found in the catalog.

British West Indies and the sugar industry

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  • 4 Currently reading

Published by J. W. Root in Liverpool .
Written in English

    Places:
  • West Indies, British,
  • West Indies, British.
    • Subjects:
    • Sugar growing -- West Indies, British.,
    • West Indies, British -- Economic conditions.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby J. W. Root.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsF2131 .R78
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxvii, 159 p.
      Number of Pages159
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6916805M
      LC Control Number02013422
      OCLC/WorldCa3198607


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British West Indies and the sugar industry by J. W. Root Download PDF EPUB FB2

The British West Indies and the sugar industry [John William. Root] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This book, The British West Indies and the sugar industry.

6, by J. Root, is a replication of a book originally British West Indies and the sugar industry book before It.

Sugar And Slavery: An Economic History Of The British West Indies [Sheridan, Richard] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Sugar And Slavery: An Economic History Of The British West IndiesCited by: An adequate history of the West Indies sugar plantations, their rise and fall, and their importance in gaining wealth for the overall British Empire as the central focus of the rum-sugar-slave trade.

My only real problem with the book was that it was a very well-researched but strictly factual transmission of information/5. Sugar and Slavery: An Economic History of the British West Indies, Richard B. Sheridan. Canoe Press, Nevis Merchants and the Sugar Industry.

The Stapleton Plantations in Nevis. An Economic History of the British West Indies, The British West Indies Sugar Industry in the Late 19th Century. Beachey. Oxford, Blackwell, - Sugar - pages.

1 Review. From inside the book. What people are saying - Write a review. LibraryThing Review User Review - tobagotim - LibraryThing. Beachey covers the economic downturn of the sugar industry in the British Caribbean in 4/5(1). Full text of "The British West Indies and the sugar industry" See other formats.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Root, J.W. (John William). British West Indies and the sugar industry. Liverpool, J.W. Root, (OCoLC) Sugar and Slaves presents a vivid portrait of English life in the Caribbean more than three centuries ago. Dunn examines sugar production techniques, the vicious character of the slave trade, the problems of adapting English ways to the tropics, and the appalling mortality rates for both blacks and whites that made these colonies the richest, but in human terms the least.

Book digitized by Google from the library of the University of Michigan and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Skip to main content. This banner text can have markup The British West Indies and the sugar industry Item Preview Book digitized by Google from the library of the University of Michigan and uploaded to the Internet Pages: How Sugar Changed the World.

By Heather Whipps 02 June Shares. Sugar, or White Gold, as British colonists called it, was the engine of the slave trade that brought millions of Africans to Author: Heather Whipps.

Topic: Problems faced by the Sugar Industry in the British West Indies specifically Jamaica. Research Question: The problems faced by the Sugar Industry affected the British West Indies during the period of In light of those problems to what extent did this result in the decline of sugar and the economic state of Jamaica.

Rationale/ Aim. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Beachey, R.W. British West Indies sugar industry in the late 19th century.

Oxford, Blackwell, (OCoLC) The sugar revolution in Cuba The Dominican Republic Louisiana and Brazil European beet sugar The backwardness of the British West Indian sugar industry Causes The Royal Commission of –83 The Norman Commission of The need for alternative crops Before the Norman Commission File Size: KB.

British West Indies and the sugar industry book Under the impact of the sugar revolution the price of land leapt up, in some parts of Barbados by a much as thirty times.

For example, a parcel of land of about 10 acres had been sold for £25 inwhich gives an average price of under £3 an acre. Inwhen the sugar revolution was almost com-plete in Barbados, land was over £30 an acre. The British West Indies, sometimes abbreviated to the BWI, is a collective term for the British territories historically established in the Anglo-Caribbean: Anguilla, the Cayman Islands, Turks and Caicos Islands, Montserrat, the British Virgin Islands, The Bahamas, Barbados, Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Grenada, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the.

Beachey, The British West Indies Sugar Industry in the Late 19th Century (Westport: Greenwood Press, ; original edition ), – Google Scholar Author: Bonham C. Richardson. The contributions of the Dutch to the Caribbean vary from technical to financial in the following each of these contributions are discussed and assessed to show how they perpetuated the development of the Caribbean.

To begin, in the mid 17th century sugar cane was brought into the British West Indies by the Dutch from Brazil. impact which the Revolution and postwar British policy had on the state of the sugar industry and the continued development of the economy The author has demonstrated also that the American War of the British West Indies, and this was deepened by stringently imposed mercantilist policies.

Unlike the position adopted by Seymour Drescher, this. Richard B. Sheridan, Sugar and Slavery: An Economic History of the British West Indies,Kingston: Canoe Press, University of the West Indies, (), xx + by:   During the Colonial period, Britain tried to control the West Indies trade and her mainland colonies.

Through the various Navigation Acts, the Molasses Act (), and the Sugar Act (), the Crown aimed to prevent trade and. Indeed, evidence gleaned by other scholars such as John Ward (British West Indian Slavery) from plantation records similar to those used by Carrington shows that rates of return from British West Indian sugar planting just before were more or less identical to those achieved in the so-called “silver age” of sugar before.

The Sugar Revolution brought about demographic, social, economical and political changes in the British West Indies (Greenwood and Hamber, ). Unlike more broadly based revolutions like the Industrial and Agricultural Revolution, the Sugar Revolution points to the transformative power of a single commodity.

Beachey, R.The British West Indies sugar industry in the late 19th century / R.W. Beachey Blackwell Oxford Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required. The West Indies have a tropical maritime maximum temperatures over most of the region range from the mids F (upper 20s C) from December to April to the upper 80s F (low 30s C) from May to November.

Nighttime temperatures are about 10 °F (6 °C) cooler. Most islands experience a wet and a dry season; annual rainfall totals range from 30 to 80 inches. Indeed, it mandated the return of many previous migrants who invariably ended up in the growing urban centres of the British West Indies.

Wages fell further as unemployment rose. The s saw the price of sugar collapse as the Americans ramped up investment and sugar production in Cuba on a massive scale.

The fifth book is an examination of agriculture in the Caribbean, with a focus on the sugar industry. In the sixth and final book, Edwards describes the British system of colonial government in the West Indies and describes the recent history of political and economic relations with Britain and the newly independent United States.

In the 17th century sugar cane was brought into British West Indies from Brazil. At that time most local farmers were growing cotton and tobacco. However, strong competition from the North American colonies meant that prices in these crops were falling.

The owners of the large plantations decided to switch to growing sugar cane. Topic: Problems faced by the Sugar Industry in the British West Indies specifically Jamaica. Research Question: The problems faced by the Sugar Industry affected the British West Indies during the period of In light of those problems to what extent did this result in the decline of sugar and the economic state of Jamaica.

Rationale/ Aim. Sir Arthur Lewis in the immediate post- World War II period advocated industrialization of the British West Indies, he adopted a policy called ‘ Industrialisation by Invitation.

’ He felt that this was a step needed to be taken for the British West Indies to develop. Sir Arthur Lewis policy aided in the development of the B.

- Explore pamelamontegut's board "Books" on Pinterest. See more ideas about West indies, Books and British virgin islands pins. This book reminds me of Mintz's Sweetness and Power, and tackles similar topics - the development of the sugar industry and African slavery in the West Indies.

It's dry, but really interesting and informative and not wordy or brainy. It's /5. average "two hundred hogsheads of sugar of sixteen cwt. and one hundred IB. Edwards, The History, Civil and Commercial, of the British West Indies, 5 Vols.

(5th Edition. London ) Vol. 2 Book 5 Chap. CSEC History Resource Guide. This guide contains a list of key select primary and secondary resources (books, photographs, manuscripts, maps, File Size: KB. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

The British West Indies sugar industry in the late 19th century by R. Beachey,Greenwood Press edition, in EnglishPages:   The islands of the British West Indies saw foreign competition from the slave grown sugar of Louisiana and Cuba.

However, by the 's, due to a loan from the British government, Trinidad, Antigua, Barbados, British Guiana and St. Kitts all survived the equalization crisis.

The sugar industry in Jamaica, on the other hand, continued to 1/5. In many ways, sugar made the British West Indies what they are today. Sugar was the major driver of the West Indian economy. Perhaps more importantly, it was because of sugar that African slaves. The British sugar industry was at its peak in the mid 18th century, particularly in Jamaica.

Plantations produc hogsheads of sugar in were producinghogsheads by Although initially sugar was an expensive item on the shopping list of the wealthy, in just 50 years Britain's sugar imports from the West Indies had.

Topic: Problems faced by the Sugar Industry in the British West Indies specifically Jamaica. Thesis statement: The problems that the sugar industry faced led to immense problems in the British West Indies.

This essay examines the problems in which the sugar industry faced during the period of   University Press of Florida Book: The Sugar Industry and the Abolition of Slave Trade, Contributors: Selwyn H. Carrington. ISBN Numbers: Subject(s): Latin American - History.

East India Sugar: Papers respecting the culture and manufacture of sugar in British India: also notices of the cultivation in other parts of Asia, etc.

London: James Pattison et al., Edwards, Bryan, The History Civil and Commercial, of the British colonies in the West Indies. Barbados’s Sugar Industry Takes Off northern Brazil to the Caribbean islands,” writes Richard B.

Sheridan in his book, “Sugar and Slavery: An .Tag: British West Indies. The Local vs Global in Caribbean Sugar. Haiti, institute of british geographers, international sugar industry, Lesser Antilles, Neil Ward, Pamela Richardson-Ngwenya, Peter Jackson, Political Geography, Polly Russell, Sugar, Sugarcane, university of east anglia, West Indies, World Bank.The West Indies Sugar Company was a wholly-owned subsidiary of the British sugar refiners Tate & Lyle, which had gone into sugar production inacquiring plantations in Jamaica and Trinidad.

Daily Gleaner, 3 May,